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  1. #1
    DD's Collector Faded's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    6,907

    Morality and Mortality (Doctors)

    If you read the title correctly, I wanted to start a debate on the issues of Morality and Mortality when it comes to doctors and nurses. You are probably asking yourself now what relevance this brings to the table in terms of the Debate Hall, and honestly, I found it fitting.

    We just got done seeing my grandmother in the hospital as she is being transfered to a nursing home tomorrow or sometime soon. The nurse came in and talked to us about Hospice Care and the current status of my grandmother and her hospital visits. My grandmother has heart failure in which she has to use a Pace Maker, Bladder Cancer which is in remission, and has survived through Polio in which she was put into an iron lung for a year or so during her bout with Polio as a kid. All of the irrelevant things aside, the nurse said this and I quote her exact words:

    "If she goes to a nursing home, she will more than likely need Hospice Care to make sure that she has the attention that she needs because we don't want her back in here again to treat her if this happens again"

    Now, one could simply interpret this as saying that she wants my grandmother to feel better and live longer; however, what she truly meant was in around-about way of saying, "we don't want her to die here." Can a nurse or a licensed practician even remotely say this and deny a living patient medical attention just because they want them to die in the hands of euthenasia? Plus, can they force Hospice about a human being even if they aren't in the terminal stage of their life because this is what these doctors want to do? Are there any issues with morality here or mortality for that matter because I would think the patient has the right to live out the rest of their days in comfort in their own way instead of by a group of registered nurses that will give you morphine to be in comfort, but not a tylenol for the pain? I'd like to hear your opinions because my opinion basically stays by my previous statement and the fact that you cannot deny a person of medical care as it goes past the oath that doctors have to take.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    398

    Re: Morality and Mortality (Doctors)

    Quote Originally Posted by Faded
    "If she goes to a nursing home, she will more than likely need Hospice Care to make sure that she has the attention that she needs because we don't want her back in here again to treat her if this happens again"
    I think what they mean is that it costs money to treat a patient, and that money could be better spent if your grandmother was under Hospice Care. I don't think there was any malice in it, not to mention that with the condition your grandmother is in she would probably be better for it in the long run.


 

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