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  1. #1
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    London.
    Posts
    1,294

    My horror story.

    Trapped


    Red Sea, August 2256
    It was a calm, cool day and the RSHMS Invincible was cruising along in the Red Sea, having sailed from Sharm El Sheikh with a cargo of spice, transport by plane having been outlawed a hundred years ago. Her captain, a man named James Walker, nudged her massive wheel to the right, and the great ship gently moved to starboard. The RSHMS Invincible was indeed a great ship. Rising 25 stories above the water, stretching along the skyline with her full 8 miles of length, and spreading herself out a mile across the water. As she wheeled round slowly, leaving a long trail of white water behind her massive stern, George Walker, the captain’s son, was trying to figure out his airship design. He loved flying. If he could only build this airship… He hated being on board a ship. He wanted to be back on dry land again. Oh yes, he had friends on the ship. It was so big, there were towns on board. He went to school in the larger of these towns. But there was something about the motion of the ship that made him think of the fathoms and fathoms of water below, and the all-time fear that the ship might sink. Yes, the scientists and engineers said that it was unsinkable. But diamond mixed with the steel of the hull didn’t make George feel any safer. Anyway, look what happened to the titanic two hundred years ago? The engineers thought that was unsinkable. They were wrong, weren’t they?
    As he was thinking, the ship gave a sudden lurch. His maths books slid off the cabin table. An alarm sounded somewhere in the forward hold of the ship, joined soon by another in the bridge. They had hit a reef! His father came running into the cabin, which was slightly on its side, though the ship was still moving with a shuddering gait.
    ‘The hull should hold until we get over the reef. Get your lifejacket on just in case. It’s in the locker above your bunk. I’m going up onto the bridge to try and steer her through the deepest course.’
    ‘Yes father’.
    George nervously pulled the heavy green jacket out of the locker. As he did so, there was a sickening crunch from the hold below, and the sound of water.
    ‘Shit’, said George, and put on his lifejacket. Up he rushed to the bridge where it was clear the ship was lower in the water than usual, but it was not sinking further, nor slanting to one side. It had stopped moving. His father was in great confusion.
    ‘There isn’t meant to be a reef here! We’re in the middle of the red sea! We should have 60 fathoms below us! I don’t understand!’
    ‘Calm down dad. Has anyone gone down to the hold to inspect the damage?’
    ‘Yes, there is a hundred and twenty metre gash in the forward hold. Diving bells have been submerged to assess the damage. So far we are not going to sink, as we are resting on some reef or other. But there isn’t a reef here! I know our exact coordinates!’
    At that moment, one of the divers entered the cabin.
    ‘Captain, I can’t understand it! There is a reef stretching out for ten miles on either side of us! Including where we were just now, sailing fine.’
    There was a hushed silence on the bridge after he’d said these last two words.
    ‘What the hell is going on,’ said the captain quietly. And then, he turned to the microphone of the PA system. ‘Ladies and gentlemen, we are in no danger. The ship is holed, but we are resting on a reef, and will not sink any further. The ship has enough provisions on her to last nearly a year. We will not be short of electricity, as the solar panels are functioning perfectly. We are sorry for any inconvenience in delaying your journey.’ He put the microphone down and turned away to the rest of the bridge. ‘I’m afraid it won’t be as simple as that. What I’m afraid of is that we only have a few weeks before the reef crumbles under our 780,000 tonnes. We will have to get help in some way.’

    ……………………………………………………………………………………….....

    ‘I swear we are further out of the water than we were yesterday,’ said George at breakfast the next morning. His father looked out of the window at the calm, placid sea.
    ‘You know, I think you’re right. I’ll have a look after breakfast.’
    Breakfast did not last long. As soon as the captain had finished his coffee, he climbed up to the bridge.
    ‘Anyone in here?’
    No answer.
    ‘Hullo?’
    Still silence.
    ‘Hell. Where are the damned bridge crew?’
    Then he noticed the sea. Or lack of it.
    They were marooned a hundred feet above the water, on the reef. The captain was frantic.
    ‘This is urgent!’
    He yelled into the speaking tube, ‘George, I need you up here NOW!!!’
    Down below, George was busy scoffing toast. ‘Sure dad, one sec’. He put a piece of toast in his mouth and started to climb the ladder, when he stopped suddenly. He had seen through the porthole. A hundred and fifty feet of dry reef was below them.
    In the bridge, the captain raised the lifeboat crew. ‘We need to get off this ship, fast. I want you too see if you can carry a lifeboat to the edge of the reef, and get her off from there. It will take time, but we have to get the passengers off safe and sound.’
    The leader of the lifeboat gang ordered his men to test the reef, to see if it was firm enough to get a boat across. ‘George, give us a hand and let down a ladder and test the coral.’
    George pulled the rope ladder from its locker, and lobbed it over the side. It clanged loudly against the boat’s hull. Cautiously, he put his foot on the first rung of the ladder. Slowly he climbed down, and put one foot on the gleaming yellow and pink coral of the reef. He let out a scream as he fell through instantly. The reef was as brittle as a dry bone!
    As he fell, pieces of the coral scratched at George’s face, his neck, his arms, his legs. After what seemed an eternity, he finally hit water. It was cool, clear. He tasted some. It was not salt! He looked up. The opening had closed above him.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..

    Aboard ship, the captain was beside himself. ‘WHY’D YOU GET MY SON TO DO IT? LAZY BASTARDS! YOU’RE DISSMISSED!!! ‘
    Bashfully, the crew climbed down the ladder off the bridge. The captain picked up the microphone, and tried to get hold of the first mate. All he heard was a crackle of static. He tried the next frequencies. Static. Another and another. No answer. As a last resort, he tried the radio pager. He dialled the first mate’s code, put it to his ear, and listened apprehensively. At first he heard static. After a couple of seconds, a whining noise built up, so loud that it drowned out the insistent warble. And then a voice, but definitely not the mate’s.
    ‘HELP,’ it screamed. ‘SOS! SOMEBODY! ANYONE! WE’RE GOING UNDER! TAKING WATER IN AT THE FRONT OF THE PLANE! LIFEJACKETS DESTR-‘and then it cut off with a sharp bang, and the pager blew up in the captain’s hand.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..
    George was actually quite enjoying it. He was somehow floating through the deep, and yet he could breathe. Up above him he could see the bottom of the reef, which for some reason was floating. He pushed himself down further. You couldn’t really call it swimming, as it wasn’t exactly water. There were no fish. A few hundred feet below him, he spied the wreckage of something on the ocean bed. He flew? closer. A plane. It must have been there for around a hundred years. It looked like something out of a history book. He went closer. Its registration was K-791. There was a door, scarred by rust and barnacles. He reached for the handle, pulled, and the door slowly swung open. He walked in through it. There was a skeleton in one of the seats. He walked to the back of the aeroplane, past more bleached skeletons. There, he found a grille. Somehow, George felt an uncanny fascination with that grille. Some air vent or other. He went closer. All at once, a finger shot through the grille. On an impulse, George seized it. It tugged, but George would not let go. He could not. After a minute or so, the finger went weak. George let go.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..
    Richmond, London, January 2006
    It was freezing. Not just your ordinary cold. Freezing. Harry’s breath misted in front of him as the minibus pulled into the swimming pool carpark. Some wag had vandalised the ‘Pools on the park’ sign so that it now read
    Poo on the ark
    Harry sniggered. ‘Awl off th’ bus pleasssse,’ Shouted their driver. Harry wrapped his coat tight around him as he climbed down the steps. Snow was thick on the ground. ‘Now, it was vewy kynd of Mrs. Huntington to let youy lot have a Christmas treat trip to the poo’, and I don’t want anyone misbehyving. Go and get chynged.’
    Ten minutes later, Harry was standing on the diving block. It was warmer in the pool. He took a breath, and dived. He went into the water like a fish, turning over and over. Down, down he floated, right to the bottom. He was not scared of the 3.60 metres of water over his head. Harry loved swimming. He could hold his breath for over two minutes. Now, on the bottom, he spied something. A metal grille, with a few plasters and a bit of hair and phlegm stuck there, waving around. Revolted, Harry went to get a closer look. He saw something under the grating. A glinting something. He put his finger through the grating to see what it was…
    Five minutes later, the body of a boy was raised from the bottom of the pool, where he had been floating for several minutes. The lifeguards were puzzled, how could he have drowned down there. All there was was a grating. He must have got his finger stuck in that. It was dismissed as a bizarre accident.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..

    Red Sea, August 2256
    George felt strange. After letting go of the finger, he suddenly felt a strong need for air. He swam out of the plane, and the door floated shut behind him. The need for air got stronger. He was suffocating! Slowly, the energy seeped out of his body. He felt as if his life was gradually seeping into the water. Suddenly, his wounds started to sting. The water was salt. He pushed up further. He had no energy. He couldn’t breathe. Black started to encroach on the edge of his vision. He tried to swim upward. The bottom of the reef didn’t seem to get any nearer. Stars floated before his eyes. He blacked into unconsciousness.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..
    Red Sea, August 2050
    The tall, distinctive silhouettes of Mushroom Clouds rose up on the horizon, glittering yellow and grey and pink in the light of the setting sun. A Boing 747, registration K-791, was cruising low over the sea. Filled with rich refugees trying to escape from the devastation of Europe, it was found in a plane repair hanger at terminal 10 in Heathrow airport. All it needed to be ready for flight was a ventilation grating. The plane staff looked in the 10 mile radius of Heathrow, but none could be found for some reason. The chief engineer went home to Richmond, tired as a result of the vastly increased radiation levels. Across the road, there was a fire burning in the Pools on the Park on the A316. Suddenly, his car was practically blown off the road by the force of the swimming pool exploding. It had taken a direct hit by a bomb. A metal grating smashed through his windscreen, shattering it to smithereens, and it embedded itself, still hot, in the passenger seat of his car. ‘Good news bad news,’ he thought, and turned round for Heathrow.
    Now, one of the 747’s wings was on fire. They were only twenty feet above the waves. The pilot knew they were going to have to ditch. All at once, the co-pilot sighted an enemy battleship on the horizon. A burst of fire spurted from one of the guns. ‘Shit, we’re being shot at,’ said the pilot, and landed the plane in the sea. They floated there for around a minute, before the shell hit. The plane was blown metres into the air. ‘HELP,’ screamed the pilot into the radio. ‘SOS! SOMEBODY! ANYONE! WE’RE GOING UNDER! TAKING WATER IN AT THE FRONT OF THE PLANE! LIFEJACKETS DESTR-‘ At that moment, a second shell hit them, and they were thrown beneath the waves.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..
    Red Sea, August 2256
    And as the sun set at last, the great ship gave a lurch. The reef was disappearing. With a sight of water filling the vast chambers, eight miles of ship disappeared beneath the waves, carrying a distraught captain to his son.

    THE END

    I know it sucks. It was a project for my english teacher.
    keep shtum.

  2. #2
    Dedicated Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    wow
    Posts
    548
    i rather enjoyed the story, if i could change one thing though it would be the massive size of that ship ( even though it was 250 yearas into the future i think the size seems to big to even be possible). other than tha, great work


 

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