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  1. #1
    Regular Member neilhavkin's Avatar
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    How to Make a Great .STK in Pivot

    Here's my text tutorial on how to make a good .STK in Pivot! The video comes out when I get a graphics card that lets me render video in Vegas and After Effects. If you have any good video cards you'd like to recommend, please enlighten me.

    This comes from the mouth of THE FUCKING MASTER of .STK making, so you'd better sit still and listen up 'cause this gon be gooood.

    So step one is quite simple, and it is to pick something you want to make. Could be an AK-47, a Jeep, an Apache, or Goku, it doesn't matter. Download a picture of it.

    Step numero dos is to download Transparent Windows, then run it. A little white bar should appear in the upper right hand corner of all your windows, which has a slider on it that adjusts the transparency of that window. Download here:

    Transparent Windows - Free Download - Tucows Downloads

    I suggest using this link since its the only one I know won't give you a virus. There's a few toolbar links, so make sure you don't forget those.

    After this, open the picture you downloaded in step one in a photo editor. I prefer Adobe Photoshop, but GIMP or even MS Paint will still work. Resize it to whatever size you want. Go into Pivot, set the transparency to 90% (either with the slider, or by right clicking on your tab bar, then hover over the "Transparency" tab, then click "90%." Click "File" in the upper left hand corner (I know its hard to see, but if Pivot is fullscreen, it shouldn't be that hard to find it,) then "Create Figure Type." Then, in the upper left hand corner of THAT window, click "New."

    Step four is to set the Stick Figure Builder's transparency to 40%. Now, there's a window that appears to be 50% transparent, and then a picture of what you wanna make underneath it. So all you do is move the starting handle to somewhere on the picture (you MUST keep the starting handle as a dynamic segment, which can be toggled by clicking the fourth button down on the left-hand column of the menu,) and begin to draw the outline. Every segment OTHER THAN THE STARTING HANDLE, change to a static segment. Once you finish the outline, do the fill. Start out filling large areas with large segments, then fill the smaller areas with smaller segments, all of which should be STATIC. Once you finish, save the .STK and add it to the animation. Begin to resize it, and change the angle. You will begin to see small areas that become unfilled at certain angles. This is normal, and can easily be fixed by either changing the size or the angle of the figure slightly, or by going into the Stick Figure Builder and going over that area with a segment a few times. Once you finish this, you can save it, rename it, and use it!

    A few hints: The smaller segments you use, the more detail the .STK will have, but also the higher chance it is that you will reach the segment limit (which is 255 segments.) Achieving a good level of detail that is under the segment limit is a fine line, that takes a while to master. But like most things, once you get the hang of it, you'll be quite good at it. Another good idea is to save the .STK regularly. Sometimes I will spend an hour making one .STK. If the power goes out, if I accidentally click the "Close" button, the hour of work I just put in will be gone - forever. This is not good and usually makes me have to slowly count to ten so I don't shriek and throw my MIDI Controller at my monitor. Also, if you're going to have parts of the figure on multiple levels, it's good to make separate .STKS for each level AS WELL as one .STK that is all of them combined, just so you know how it fits together and so when its not needed on several levels, its less of a hassle to move.

    Thats about it. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please PM me, reply to this post, drop a comment on my website Stuff Moose - Blog or email me at neillikespie@gmail.com. If you have any .STK requests (always good to have someone else do your work for you) just contact me and I'll have it done in around two days. If you have any .STKs you made using this, feel free to send me a link, and I'll enjoy animating with it!

    Thanks for reading!

    - Neilium
    Last edited by neilhavkin; 13 Sep 2013 at 01:15 AM.

  2. #2
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    Why didn't you post this in Pivot Tutorials? Nice tut btw.

  3. #3
    Regular Member neilhavkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Black Mamba View Post
    Why didn't you post this in Pivot Tutorials? Nice tut btw.
    Ummmm... IDK dude. And thanks. I try.

  4. #4
    Dedicated Member WafflesMgee's Avatar
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    This is less of a tutorial on how to make good sticks and more of a tutorial on how to turn images into sticks. I keep on thinking I should make a stick making tutorial on how a stick is made Waffles' Way but I keep on thinking that it isn't going to get attention.
    We need more robots, people. WHERE ARE THE DAMN ROBOTS?

  5. #5
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    You could do it with someone who also knows how to make sticks to get more knowledge / different opinions that might give the tutorial entertaining "arguments" about stickety things. Also it's not about attention, it's about helping (am I wrong?), but I am sure since it's pretty much only of it's kind on this forum, it will later on be known as "THE stick tutorial", like Bahamut's tuts. I'd be glad to give some insight on it too, if you decide to make it a big thing for years to come.


 

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